THE PROBLEM:

The material is now pumped by a pneumatic diaphragm pump. The thickness and friction of the liquid can cause the diaphragm pump to fail and not be able to control the required flow.

THE SOLUTION:

Replace the centrifugal pump with a pneumatic diaphragm pump. The flow rate is constant as a function of viscosity. Eccentric disc pumps can also increase material flow through the line by pulling material into the pump. The eccentric disc pump can also be dried to completely remove the product from the pipeline.

WHAT IS VISCOSITY? WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?

Viscosity is often referred to as the thickness of a liquid. Water (low viscosity) and honey (high viscosity) are available. However, this definition is misleading when considering liquids of different densities. At the molecular level, viscosity is the result of interactions between different molecules in a liquid and can also be understood as friction between molecules in a liquid. Similar to friction between moving solids, viscosity determines the energy required to move fluid.

VISCOSITY AFFECTS PUMP SELECTION:

One of the most important things to know before choosing a pump is the viscosity of the pumped fluid. This is because the viscosity or thickness of the fluid affects its operation in the pump. This is where things get complicated because the viscosity of a liquid/fluid can change under various conditions.

 MOST IMPORTANT thing  ABOUT VISCOSITY DURING PUMP SELECTION:

Viscosity is primarily thought of as resistance to flow and affects the pump. Holding high-viscosity liquids makes it difficult to attach and remove low-viscosity liquids, such as pumps that use propellers instead of hands to move the liquid. This is a problem when pumping fluids such as engine oil that adhere to the turbine surface.